Manual/Elections

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Elections work differently in each type of realm.

FAQ's

  • You are eligible to be elected even if you are wounded or at a Tournament.
  • You are not eligible to be elected if you are in prison or seriously wounded.
  • You are not able to vote if you are wounded, at a tournament or in prison.
  • You need to have at least 20 honour and 15 prestige to normally be eligible to be elected ruler.

Election Triggers

There are two basic circumstances which trigger an election: automatic monthly elections such as in Democracies, or ad hoc elections to fill a vacant (elected) position. (Not all vacant positions are elected; in many systems certain positions are appointed by the ruler.)

There are several things which will cause a person to lose his position, and so prompt an ad hoc election:

  • Stepping down
  • Retiring (Character deletion)
  • Leaving the realm
  • Going idle (not logging in for a week for local lords, or 5 days for those that hold council positions)
  • Being killed

In special cases, leaders can be protested out by the troop leaders of the realm, or removed from office by the Titans or Magistrates for violation of the game rules or abuse of authority.

Voting and how it works

  • In various types of governments, some positions are elected by the people, while other positions are appointed by the ruler.
  • To Vote, you simply set your voting under "Paperwork" for the candidate you'd like to vote for in each of 4 categories (that vote is saved and you will continue to vote that way until you go back into "Paperwork" and change your vote): Ruler, General, Judge and Banker.
  • You get 3 voting slots. Your top candidate will receive the most votes, your second candidate half that and the third a quarter. For example: a Troop Leader votes Candidate A in the first position, Candidate B in the second position, and Candidate C in the third position. (Vote numbers vary by government types and position being voted for.) That means Candidate A would recieve 4 votes (hypothetical number), while Candidate B would recieve 2 votes and Candidate C would recieve 1 vote.
  • The winner of an election is, of course, the candidate with the highest total of votes. In the case of a tie, the one with the higher prestige wins.
  • You can also refuse to be elegible to be elected into any electable or appointable position. You would select "Refuse to become": Ruler, General, Judge, Banker, Local Lord or Marshal.

Voting in a Monarchy

Elected vs. Appointed
Ruler: Elected Once
General: Appointed by Ruler
Judge: Elected Once
Banker: Appointed by Ruler
  • The Ruler is voted for once, and they remain until they are removed in one of many different fashions. The Arch Priest(ess) is also elected once. The Ruler has the ability to appoint the Royal Treasurer (Banker), and High Marshal (General) when those posts are vacated.
  • Prestige carries with it great weight when voting for a new king; the most prestigious and aristocratic have far more say then the common knight does. When voting for the judge, everyone's vote is equal.




Voting in a Tyranny

Elected vs. Appointed
Ruler: Elected Once
General: Appointed by Ruler
Judge: Appointed by Ruler
Banker: Appointed by Ruler
  • As with monarchy, the ruler is elected just once; once elected, the ruler appoints all other positions in the realm.
  • The slight benefit for the average noble is that all votes are equal; no matter your rank or prestige. However, since all power ultimately lies with the ruler, it is not as much of a blessing as it would seem.




Voting in a Republic

Elected vs. Appointed
Ruler: Elected Monthly
General: Appointed by Ruler
Judge: Elected Monthly
Banker: Appointed by Ruler
  • The Ruler and the judge undergo monthly elections.
  • In ruler elections, Dukes will recieve many times the number of votes than normal nobles. For judges, all are equal.






Voting in a Democracy

Elected vs. Appointed
Ruler: Elected Monthly
General: Elected Monthly
Judge: Elected Monthly
Banker: Elected Monthly
  • All positions are elected once a month
  • All votes are equal.







Voting in a Theocracy

Elected vs. Appointed
Ruler: Elected Once
General: Elected Monthly
Judge: Appointed by Ruler
Banker: Elected Monthly
  • The Ruler is elected once, the general and the banker are elected monthly. The judge is under direct appointment of the ruler.
  • Lords will have greater say in who guides the productivity and safety of their realm, depending on their sub-rank in the hierarchy of Lords. For rulers, votes are based on prestige as a monarchy.





See Also